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AMPS: Past Seminar Series

Past Seminar Series

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2013 Seminar Series


DEFYING THE LAW OF LEAST EFFORT: DELIBERATE PRACTICE AND THE THREE STAGES OF EXPERTISE
Speaker : Prof. Dr. Adina Mornell
Date :14th Mar

Abstract:

Link to video podcast: http://content.lecture.unimelb.edu.au:8080/ess/echo/presentation/f8443546-5345-4de0-b3e2-b36009e078b9/media.m4v

Link to audio podcast: http://content.lecture.unimelb.edu.au:8080/ess/echo/presentation/f8443546-5345-4de0-b3e2-b36009e078b9/media.mp3

In the last few years, the cognitive neurosciences have provided new insights into the processes of learning, storage, and retrieval from memory. At the same time, sports psychologists are developing ever more scientific training methods. Empirical studies done with chess masters, commercial pilots, performing musicians, and surgeons, are allowing researchers to further define a work pattern identified as “deliberate practice” – an absolute prerequisite for expertise. In these diverse disciplines, one finds cutting-edge knowledge with implications for professionals in all work fields. This lecture compares myths and reality regarding the issue of innate talent versus hard work. Effective learning strategies and memorisation techniques are presented, as well as the “Three Stages of Expertise.” This model provides a structure useful in the evaluation of one’s own work habits and previous experience. On the basis of this information, musicians can develop viable alternatives to behaviour that has become routine.



Prof. Dr. Adina Mornell
University of Music and Theater Munich


Born in Los Angeles, Adina Mornell is a classical pianist and recording artist who studied Music, American Literature, Musicology, and Psychology, receiving degrees in the United States, Germany, and Austria, the latter being a doctorate in Music Psychology. She is currently Professor of Instrumental and Vocal Pedagogy (IGP) at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Munich, Germany. Her book on stage fright, Lampenfieber und Angst bei ausübenden Musikern, is one of the few scientific publications on the topic in the German language. She is responsible for the book series Art in Motion. Musical and Athletic Motor Learning and Performance, and regularly publishes articles about art and science.
In addition to her empirical research on musical performance and expertise, and her career as a concert artist, she is active as an educator for musicians and music teachers, as well as for executives and managers, at institutions of higher education in both Europe and the United States.

Peak Performance Psychology
Speaker : Dr Don Greene
Date :18th Apr

Abstract:

The Faculty of the VCA & MCM, in association with Music, Mind and Wellbeing and the Melbourne Neurosciences Institute at The University of Melbourne presents

Dr Don Greene
Performance and Sports Psychologist

This is a FREE talk, but bookings essential. Please visit http://unimelbpeakperformance.eventbrite.com.au/ to register.

Seminar summary

Although Peak Performances cannot be forced, understanding the components of these transcendent, valued moments of superior human functioning may allow them to occur more frequently, with greater intensity, and longer duration. This presentation will address the common characteristics of peak experiences, peak performances, and flow states. The works of Drs. Maslow, James, Nideffer, Csikszenentmihaly, and Garfield and Bennett will be discussed, along with an exploration of the characteristics of the autotelic personality, left and right brain phenomenon, and increasing the probability of getting in the zone and staying there longer.

Biography

Don Greene has been helping people overcome performance anxiety for over 25 years, including musicians, actors, dancers, professional sportspeople and police SWAT officers.

He earned his doctorate in sports psychology at the United States International University in San Diego, and subsequently developed an assessment tool that has proven critical in helping performing artists: the Performance Skills Inventory.

Greene has taught at The Juilliard School and the New World Symphony orchestral academy. Artists he has worked with have won auditions for major orchestras and opera companies in the United States.

He is the author of three books: Audition Success, Performance Success and Fight Your Fear and Win, and continues to work one-on-one with performing artists from his studio in San Diego.

Navigating the nexus between neuroscientific research and music education
Speaker : Anita Collins
Date :20th May

Abstract:

Anita Collins, Senior Lecturer at the Univeristy of Canberra in Music and Arts Education will be in Melbourne for a conference, and has generously agreed to present her recent research on neuroscience and music education to AMPS on Monday 20th May.

ABSTRACT
The field of neuroscientific research has the potential to offer a great deal to music educators, yet enabling educators to utilise the research findings effectively and authentically is not without its issues. The relationship between the fields of music education and neuroscientific research is influenced by many factors including historical experience, different research foci and agendas and lack of a shared nomenclature. These issues have lead to difficulties in using neuroscientific research findings to advocate for music education and limited the application of findings to models of music education pedagogy and practice. Appropriate and judicious application of neuroscientific research findings to music education advocacy, pedagogy, practice and policy requires thoughtful and informed connection that is mindful of both the limitations and the opportunities inherent in this interdisciplinary field.
This presentation explores a number of issues that exist in the nexus between neuroscientific research and music education and suggests approaches that could help navigate and advance the connections between the two fields. Recent research has explored a range of connections including the implication of a music-processing model on music education practice, the criteria used to define musicians and suggestions of ways these criteria could be used to advocate for specific developments in music education curricula.

Music on the Mind - The language of music, and the music of language
Speaker : Professor Bill Thompson - Head, Department of Psychology Macqu
Date :17th Jun

Abstract:

Scholars throughout history have contemplated the association between music and language, including Plato, Rousseau, and Darwin. Charles Darwin speculated that before our ancestors developed the capacity to communicate through language, they communicated using an earlier music-like "protolanguage" that was highly emotional in nature. In this talk, we will explore the emotional nature of music and its association with emotional speech, and I will show that emotion is a pivotal link between these two forms of human communication. I will also consider the complex emotional messages that are contained within popular music and the effects that such messages can have, the extent to which we can understand emotional messages in music and speech from others cultures, and the emotional body movements and facial expressions that people make when they are speaking or performing music.

This event is free and general admission, however tickets are required for entry. See:
http://www.melbournerecital.com.au/whatson/buytix?perfid=5716


For more information, please visit the Music, Mind and Wellbeing website:

http://cmmw.unimelb.edu.au

Music on the Mind - The DAG factor. Why we like music with contagious emotions
Speaker : Associate Professor Emery Schubert - School of Music, Universit
Date :15th Jul

Abstract:

Many people enjoy music that makes them feel strong emotions. However, music psychologists have become interested in the distinction between felt emotion and the emotion that the music is representing. For example, a piece might make a listener feel little emotion, while the music itself expresses very strong emotions. Such a simultaneous difference in emotions has only recently been researched, and one study of this difference suggests that people like music when the emotion felt is well matched with the expressed emotion: This matching has been referred to as the 'Differential Affect Gap' (DAG). In this presentation I will report how the DAG factor works, and how it might be explained. An interesting idea arises from the philosophical view that music has human-like qualities, and just as with humans, we can have empathising responses to music. Thus, we are able to 'capture' a contagious emotion in music as we do when naturally smiling when we see a friend smiling, and feel an empathic sadness when we see that person feeling sad.


This event is free and general admission, however tickets are required for entry. See:
http://www.melbournerecital.com.au/whatson/buytix?perfid=5788


For more information, please visit the Music, Mind and Wellbeing website:

http://cmmw.unimelb.edu.au

Music on the Mind - Finding your song: Constructing new meaning through songwriting
Speaker : Associate Professor Felicity Baker
Date :19th Aug

Abstract:

Throughout the ages, songs have told people’s stories about love, memories, relationships, loss, hardships, pain and suffering. Songwriters are transformed as they explore, reflect, resolve, and reconstruct meaning in life through the creation of lyrics and music. Their songs are syntheses of their personal processes or representations of their transformed selves. In this presentation, Felicity will share findings from her research regarding the role of songwriting as a transformative tool for people suffering from a range of significant health conditions.


This event is free and general admission, however tickets are required for entry. See:
http://www.melbournerecital.com.au/whatson/buytix?perfid=5792


For more information, please visit the Music, Mind and Wellbeing website:

http://cmmw.unimelb.edu.au

Music, Emotions, and Cravings in People with Substance Use Disorders
Speaker : Dr Genevieve Dingle
Date :22nd Aug

Abstract:

Recent neuroimaging research indicates that listening to pleasant music activates the same dopaminergic regions of the brain that are stimulated by drugs of addiction. Music is commonly associated with substance use contexts yet little is known about the music use of adults in substance abuse treatment, and whether music acts as a cue for emotions and relapse to substance use. In this seminar, I present my research focusing on adults’ use of music for emotional experience and regulation, first in a non clinical international survey, and then in several samples of adults in treatment for substance use disorders. Taken together, the findings show that people with substance use disorders are emotionally sensitive to music; there is some blunting of response to happy music; specific pieces of music trigger urges to use a substance, yet these individuals overwhelmingly report that music is an important part of their recovery from substance misuse. Clinical implications of the research will be discussed.

Music on the Mind - The tills are alive with the sound of muzak: effects of in-store music on consumer behaviour and attitudes
Speaker : Professor Adrian North
Date :30th Sep

Abstract:

The use of music in shops, bars and the like has long been the source of considerable light-hearted derision. The playwright J. B. Priestly once bragged of having “had it turned off in the best of places”. However, research has accumulated over the past two decades showing the myriad effects it can have. Some of these are positive for business, by for example increasing spending, influencing product choice, or even helping to control the speed and direction of customer movements. Some of these effects are positive for consumers also, by improving mood in commercial premises and helping customers to achieve their goals. This talk presents an overview of some of the many effects of music that have been identified, with particular emphasis on their commercial implications.

This event is free and general admission, however tickets are required for entry. See:
http://www.melbournerecital.com.au/whatson/buytix?perfid=5796


For more information, please visit the Music, Mind and Wellbeing website:

http://cmmw.unimelb.edu.au

Music on the Mind - Music and Happiness: How music promotes emotional health and wellbeing
Speaker : Associate Professor Nikki Rickard
Date :4th Nov

Abstract:

Music is an emotional elixir. It helps us manage our negative moods and experience highly pleasurable emotions. Music can also generate intensely sad and fearful emotions, and influence more complex states such as our sense of meaning and purpose in life. In this presentation, Nikki Rickard explores how research is providing insight into when music is beneficial for our emotional wellbeing, and when it might be used to signal ill health. The role of music as a means for young people to self-manage symptoms of depression will also be explored.

This event is free and general admission, however tickets are required for entry. See:
http://www.melbournerecital.com.au/whatson/buytix?perfid=5799


For more information, please visit the Music, Mind and Wellbeing website:

http://cmmw.unimelb.edu.au