Deprecated: mysql_connect(): The mysql extension is deprecated and will be removed in the future: use mysqli or PDO instead in /home/ampsocie/public_html/include/database.php on line 29

Warning: session_start(): Cannot send session cookie - headers already sent by (output started at /home/ampsocie/public_html/include/database.php:29) in /home/ampsocie/public_html/include/session.php on line 55

Warning: session_start(): Cannot send session cache limiter - headers already sent (output started at /home/ampsocie/public_html/include/database.php:29) in /home/ampsocie/public_html/include/session.php on line 55

Warning: session_regenerate_id(): Cannot regenerate session id - headers already sent in /home/ampsocie/public_html/include/session.php on line 56
AMPS: Past Seminar Series

Past Seminar Series

Select the that year you would like to see

1998 Seminar Series


Fingering Strategies of Pianists
Speaker : Richard Parncutt Keele University, UK
Date :16th Jan

The Nature and Etiology of Absolute Pitch
Speaker : Ron Brooker NSW Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney
Date :20th Mar

The Tactile Pulse of Music: Visualization Techniques for Developing Music Students' Tactile Response in Music Reading & Sight Reading
Speaker : Greg Mayson Australian Institute of Music
Date :17th Apr

Music Practice & Skill Acquisition
Speaker : Nancy Barry Auburn University, Alabama
Date :1st May

Pitch Perception, Rate or Place?: A Cochlear Implant User's Perspective
Speaker : Robert Fearn University of New South Wales
Date :29th May

Musicians' Emissions
Speaker : Eric LePage National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney
Date :26th Jun

Do We Need Music for Musical Thinking?
Speaker : John Geake Southern Cross University, Lismore
Date :10th Jul

Software Implementations of Some Psychoacoustical Models
Speaker : Densil Cabrera University of Sydney
Date :16th Oct

A Sensory-Motor Theory of Rhythm and Timing in Music and Speech
Speaker : Neil Todd, University of Manchester, UK
Date :2nd Nov

Abstract:

In this paper, a general theory of rhythm and timing is proposed. The central tenet of the theory is that the perception and production of rhythmic sequences, characteristic of all forms of human communication, is an elaboration of a more general sensory-motor sequencing faculty of the left hemisphere (Kimura, 1993). The theory is implemented as a computational model (Todd et al, 1998, in press) in which an attempt is made to simulate the principal brain structures involved in sequencing, namely, the auditory cortex, the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), the cerebellum, motor cortex and motor output system. Specifically, the following is proposed: (1) the temporal sequencing involved in music and speech is directly analogous to visual guidance of bodily movement; (2) the perception of such sequences is an active processes of tracking the movements which gave rise to the sequence; (3) the auditory cortex represents temporal information in terms of the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the auditory image [18]; (4) tracking is mediated by an internal model, or motor image, of the motor output system, believed to be represented by the cerebellum, which computationally may be modelled as a 'Smith Predictor' (Miall et al, 1993); and (5) the motor image is driven by a sensory-motor image, believed to be a function of PPC Stein (1995), which receives inputs from auditory cortex and reciprocal inputs from the cerebellum. The model takes sound samples as input and synchronises a simple dynamic system as output. An example is shown for tracking syllables in speech (Todd et al, in press) and beats in music (Todd and Kohon, submitted).

Kimura, D. (1993) Neuromotor Mechanisms in Human Communication. OUP: Oxford.

Miall, R.C., Weir, D.J., Wolpert, D.M. and Stein, J.F. (1993). "Is the cerebellum a Smith Predictor?" J. Mot. Behav. 25(3), 203-216.

Stein, J. (1995) "The posterior parietal cortex, the cerebellum and the visual guidance of movement". In F.W.Cody (Ed.) Neural control of skilled human movement. pp 31-49.

Todd, N.P. McAngus, Lee, C.S. and O'Boyle, D.J. (1998)."A sensory-motor theory of rhythm, time perception and beat induction". Journal of New Music Resarch.

Todd, N.P.McAngus, Lee, C.S. and O'Boyle, D.J.(in press) A sensory-motor theory of speech perception: Implications for learning, organisation and recognition. To appear in W. Ainsworth and S. Greenberg (Eds). Listening to Speech. OUP

Todd, N.P.McAngus and Kohen, S. (submitted) Testing a sensory-motor theory of rhythm perception: Human vs machine performance in a tempo tracking task.

A Sensory-Motor Theory of Rhythm and Timing in Music and Speech
Speaker : Neil Todd, University of Manchester, UK
Date :2nd Nov

Abstract:

In this paper, a general theory of rhythm and timing is proposed. The central tenet of the theory is that the perception and production of rhythmic sequences, characteristic of all forms of human communication, is an elaboration of a more general sensory-motor sequencing faculty of the left hemisphere (Kimura, 1993). The theory is implemented as a computational model (Todd et al, 1998, in press) in which an attempt is made to simulate the principal brain structures involved in sequencing, namely, the auditory cortex, the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), the cerebellum, motor cortex and motor output system. Specifically, the following is proposed: (1) the temporal sequencing involved in music and speech is directly analogous to visual guidance of bodily movement; (2) the perception of such sequences is an active processes of tracking the movements which gave rise to the sequence; (3) the auditory cortex represents temporal information in terms of the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the auditory image [18]; (4) tracking is mediated by an internal model, or motor image, of the motor output system, believed to be represented by the cerebellum, which computationally may be modelled as a 'Smith Predictor' (Miall et al, 1993); and (5) the motor image is driven by a sensory-motor image, believed to be a function of PPC Stein (1995), which receives inputs from auditory cortex and reciprocal inputs from the cerebellum. The model takes sound samples as input and synchronises a simple dynamic system as output. An example is shown for tracking syllables in speech (Todd et al, in press) and beats in music (Todd and Kohon, submitted).

Kimura, D. (1993) Neuromotor Mechanisms in Human Communication. OUP: Oxford.

Miall, R.C., Weir, D.J., Wolpert, D.M. and Stein, J.F. (1993). "Is the cerebellum a Smith Predictor?" J. Mot. Behav. 25(3), 203-216.

Stein, J. (1995) "The posterior parietal cortex, the cerebellum and the visual guidance of movement". In F.W.Cody (Ed.) Neural control of skilled human movement. pp 31-49.

Todd, N.P. McAngus, Lee, C.S. and O'Boyle, D.J. (1998)."A sensory-motor theory of rhythm, time perception and beat induction". Journal of New Music Resarch.

Todd, N.P.McAngus, Lee, C.S. and O'Boyle, D.J.(in press) A sensory-motor theory of speech perception: Implications for learning, organisation and recognition. To appear in W. Ainsworth and S. Greenberg (Eds). Listening to Speech. OUP

Todd, N.P.McAngus and Kohen, S. (submitted) Testing a sensory-motor theory of rhythm perception: Human vs machine performance in a tempo tracking task.